What Steps is the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) Taking to Identify Global Warming Potential (GWP) Refrigerants?

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The Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) has taken steps to identify and address the problem of Global Warming Potential refrigerants which are being used in heating and air conditioning units. Typical chemicals, such as Chlorine and Bromine, which are currently used in heating and air conditioning units, are known to cause damage to the ozone layer. While these chemicals are commonly leaked into the air during times when heating repair and air conditioning service is needed for a unit, these leaks can occur as well during air conditioning installation and heating installation which is not conducted properly.

The AHRI has established new methods and policies for conducting air conditioning installation, heating installation, heating repair, and air conditioning service practices that will cut down on the amount of greenhouse gases emitted into the air during these services. These methods are being taught to heating repair and air conditioning service technicians entering the field as well as heating and air conditioning installation service providers already working in this industry. These specialists are learning new ways to identify problem areas that are known to leak when providing services such as heating installation.

Research is being conducted to determine the possibility of using ammonia as a refrigerant in place of chlorine and bromine. The AHRI is developing methods that will make it possible to replace Global Warming Potential refrigerants by heating and air conditioning service technicians when servicing HVAC units. Proper handling of these refrigerants is crucial during the heating repair and air conditioning service practices.

Individuals that want to know that they are doing their part to protect the environment from harmful Greenhouse gases can ask their heating repair and air conditioning service technician if they utilize the practices and methods available through the AHRI when performing air conditioning installation, heating installation, or other heating repair and air condition service needs of their clients.

Residential and commercial building owners that are responsible for their own removal of products following heating installation or air conditioning installation services should contact the AHRI for proper disposal methods of these materials. This organization will provide you with names of companies in your area that can assist you with these needs as well as information on heating installation, air conditioning installation, and heating repair contractors that will dispose of these materials for you.